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Industry News, Latest News, New South Wales

Findings released for Sydney’s Opal Tower investigation

An interim report on the findings of the investigation of Sydney’s Opal Tower Apartment building has found the building is structurally sound and not in danger of collapse.

An interim report on the findings of the investigation of Sydney’s Opal Tower apartment building has found the building is structurally sound and not in danger of collapse.

Independent experts commissioned by the NSW Government have found that the building was structurally sound, but significant rectification works are required to repair and strengthen the damaged hob beams.

A number of issues were identified, a combination of which probably caused the observed damage to some structural members in the building, according to the report.

It also recommends further analysis should be undertaken on the structural design of the hob beams and associated structural members and that consideration should be given to strengthening them wherever they occur in the building.

Representative group for the heavy construction materials industry, Cement Concrete and Aggregates Australia (CCAA), has welcomed the findings.

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CCAA Chief Executive, Ken Slattery, said the industry is ready and willing to add its support to improvements in building industry quality standards.

“As an industry that employs over 110,000 Australians directly and indirectly, and contributes over $15 billion a year to the national economy, we want to work with developers, builders and NSW and local authorities to help rectify the problems highlighted by the report,” Slattery said.

“We believe the findings confirm that when it comes to quality and safety, the Australian concrete industry continues to meet the highest standards of quality and performance.

“Concrete is the safest of all building materials as it’s not vulnerable to external threats like fire, wind, insects, moisture and mould—all of which can result in structural damage and safety risks with lesser materials.”